Reports Report 1603d (Event 1603-2012)

This report has been linked to the following event: Event 1603-2012
Observer
NameChris H
Experience Level1/5
RemarksThank you for the site. I had no idea it existed until I witnessed this event and tried to find anyone else who had seen it. If at all possible, please forward any ensuing reports of this event to my listed email address. Thank you.
Location
AddressSwampscott, MA
Latitude42° 28' 5.47'' N (42.47°)
Longitude 70° 54' 41.56'' W (-70.91°)
Elevation-
Time and Duration
Local Date & Time2012-10-23 19:28 EDT
UT Date & Time2012-10-23 23:28 UT
Duration≈1.5s
Direction
Moving directionFrom up left to down right
Descent Angle135°
Moving
Facing azimuth282.2°
First azimuth276.34°
First elevation65°
Last azimuth314.3°
Last elevation53°
Brightness and color
Stellar Magnitude-11
Colorbright goldish/ orange
Concurrent Sound
ObservationNo
Remarks-
Delayed Sound
ObservationNo
Remarks-
Persistent train
ObservationUnknown
Duration-1s
Length20°
RemarksThe train was definitately glowing. As I was am not an experienced astronomer and was more focused on the fireball itself, I didn\'t notice wether the train persisted. What really made this sighting memorable to me was that immediately before vanishing, the fireball seemed to split into at least 2 distinct pieces w/ a sparkling effect, almost akin to fireworks. I initially thought it was a shooting star as I have seen many, but I\'ve never observed that splintering effect. Also, this event seemed more orange and less blue/white than shooting stars I\'d witnessed previously. I was quite impressed and I\'m trying not to exagerate; I listed 1-2 seconds, but it seemed longer. I listed the train at approx 20 degrees, but it may have been slightly longer.
Terminal flash
ObservationYes
RemarksThe \"flash\" was less pronounced than the fragmentation, but manifested in what I can best describe as a splintering and sparkling effect.
Fragmentation
ObservationYes
Remarks-